Showing posts with label music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label music. Show all posts

Transferring contacts, photos, music and apps from Android to iPhone

How to switch from Android to iPhone without losing everything 


Transferring contacts, photos, music and apps from Android to iPhone


We explain how to transfer contacts from Android phone to iPhone. How to transfer applications from Android to iPhone. How to transfer photos from Android to iPhone. And, yes, how to transfer music from iPhone to Android. Basically, how to switch from Android to iPhone, right? 


If you're an Android user considering switching to an iPhone, you may be concerned about the transfer process. The good news is that the transfer iPhone contacts to Android phone really could not be simpler. It turns out that Google is good at these things. And the files are very similar. The basic principle consists of a backup or cloud or a desktop machine, and then sync with iPhone. So let's get into it.

Transfer contacts from Android to iPhone: Google use the simplest form 


There are two ways to transfer contacts from Android to iOS. We will outline the bottom two, but if you've been using your Android phone for any length of time, we strongly recommend that you try them in the order you have written.

If you have been using your Android phone and Google account (Gmail, Google Play, etc) for any period of time it is likely that all your contacts will be associated with your Google account. At least you use most often should be.

So make sure you have a copy of your Android phone. Go to Settings on your Android phone and select "Accounts & sync" or similar. Enter your Gmail account and enable syncing. Your phone contacts and Google contacts should now sync.

Then go to your new iPhone. Settings> Mail, Contacts, Calendar and add your Gmail account. Make sure the contacts are enabled for the account. You should now find that all your contacts are in your Google iPhone.

Transfer contacts from Android to iPhone: deepen with Google 


Belt and suspenders, and to ensure that this process always works in the future, consider doing the following, either on his iPhone after following the above steps, or on your Android before making the move:

  1. Open the application settings of your iPhone. 
  2. Select Mail, Contacts, Calendars. 
  3. Select Add Account ... 
  4. Select Other 
  5. Select Add CardDAV Account 
  6. Fill in your account information in the following fields: 
  7. Server: enter "google.com" 
  8. User Name: Enter your full Google Account or Google Apps email address. 
  9. Password: password of your Google account or Google Apps. (If you've enabled 2-step verification, you have to generate and enter an application-specific password.) 
  10. Description: Enter a description of the account (eg, personal contacts). 
  11. Select Next at the top of the screen. 
  12. Make sure the "Contacts" option is turned ON. 
After installation is complete, open the Contacts application on your device, and synchronization begins automatically start your iPhone and Google. Any time you set up any smartphone Google should be the key to all your contacts.

Transfer contacts from Android to iPhone: only exchange SIMS 


This only works if the Android phone has a SIM size similar to its iPhone, either a micro or nano-SIM for later models of iPhone. (Of course, you can cut any SIM to fit, but do so only as a last resort. - If you mess up the SIM card and its contacts are gone forever)

First save all contacts from Android phone to your SIM. Then insert the SIM card into your iPhone, being careful not to lose the iPhone SIM. Finally, go to Settings and select "Mail, Contacts, Calendars" and click "Import SIM Contacts". When the operation is finished, you can replace the iPhone SIM card with the original card.

Android Apps transfer to iPhone


There is no easy way around this. If you have to pay for an app on Google Play, you will most likely have to pay to buy back into iTunes. That's the bad news, the good news is that in almost all cases the application you like to use in Android is available on iTunes, and access data using which will work in the other. This means that any content or service acquired through its Android app will probably be accessible on your iPhone. So once you have started using your iPhone, just sign on the iTunes app store, and start searching for those applications that you like.

Transfer photos and videos from Android to iPhone 


There are a few simple ways to do it. The first involves the installation of an application of data transfer. You can find several applications of data transfer on the Apple App Store, but remember that you need to find them first in your Android Store Play Google. Copy and recommend PhotoSync Info. Then it is easy enough to install your chosen both the Android and iPhone app, and you will be guided through moving files from one to the other.

The other way to move photos from Android to iPhone is the use of a computer with iTunes. Just find the photos and videos on your Android phone, move them to your computer, sync to iTunes, and then sync the iPhone with iTunes again. A similar process works for music, as we will describe below.

To transfer photos from Android to iPhone, simply connect your Android phone to your PC or Mac. Choose the photos and videos you want to move, and drag them to a folder on your computer. For simplicity I would create a new folder on your desktop called ... 'Photos for transfer.

Now connect your iPhone to your PC or Mac, open iTunes and click on your iPhone. Click on the photos, select "Sync photos from" checkbox and select the folder where you saved your photos. Click Apply and photos are synced to your iPhone.

Transfer music from iPhone to Android 


The principle here is similar to transfer photos from Android to iPhone. You need to get music files from your Android and on to your PC or Mac, then get the files into iTunes and sync your iPhone. It should be very simple to transfer anyThe critical stage here is a backup of Android to a PC or Mac. Because most Android devices can be mounted and used as external storage, this can be as simple as drag all music files from the folder structure of Android phone mounted, and put them into the music folder on your PC or Mac.

Now install and open iTunes on your computer. Go to Library, and then click Music. Open the folder where you put your music files, and drag them to the iTunes Music view.

Now connect your iPhone, click on the iPhone, and then click Music. You can choose to sync your entire library, or select only the songs or artists that you just added. Then click Sync and the songs will be added to your iPhone.

(Or just do not worry about owning the music and use of Spotify.)

Apple One-Click Link U2 remove junk from iTunes Marks fault Marketing Textbook

Execution is everything


Apple One-Click Link U2 remove junk from iTunes Marks fault Marketing Text

Musical tastes are personal. And it seems that force-feeding people a new album from U2, unsolicited, doesn’t go over well.

Apple giving away U2′s new Songs of Innocence is in itself not a bad thing. But there are two problems. One, the album is poorly reviewed – think Paul McCartney “Wonderful Christmastime” rather than Abbey Road. Two, because the album simply appeared in purchased music – and because iTunes (cleverly enough) displays what you’ve purchased from iCloud – it showed up in people’s collections when it didn’t belong.

So, we’ve learned something. This doesn’t work. And as always, you can’t really buy marketing. That is, sure, Aphex Twin rented a blimp, but in the end, they had more successful viral marketing because they let their fans choose to spread their new release. U2 tried to force that promotion, and even though Apple and U2 are loved by many people, the combination comes across as corporate and inauthentic.
Peter Cohen shouts at the Internet over this, but I think that’s because he’s in the unfortunate position of reading lots of tech blogs.

This isn’t a “self-indulgent, first world problem.” It’s a textbook case study in the difference in power between word-of-mouth and a poorly executed promotion.
I know lots in the music production community who were offended by the U2 move, too. And there’s a reason for that. Apple may be a big corporation, but they aren’t Coca-Cola. They’re Bic pens, or a Nikon camera, or a Gibson guitar – we use the product to make things. And they’re an RCA turntable or a pair of Sennheiser headphones, Technicolor film or a book printed by Penguin. We use the product to take in stuff we love, too. Apple’s marketing has lately been really cleverly sensitive to this (and has featured a lot of great music making apps, too). So the U2 record proved, like the release, to be a bit deaf.

There will be subtler cases of this. If YouTube or Spotify or SoundCloud tries to tell you what to like, if Facebook ultimately buries your friends under ads, it’s a problem, not because advertising can’t work, but because it can obscure the reasons to use those services. Heck, I even have to protect my own personal authenticity and CDM’s. So, yes, sometimes the reaction on the Internet overdoes the tone a bit. But filter out that tone and you’ll know what’s working and what isn’t.

And every PR person in music, every record label looking to promote a new release ought to pay attention to what has happened here. I will meanwhile enjoy scoring this Aphex Twin 1, U2 0.

And if that doesn’t say it all, this does:
https://itunes.com/soi-remove
Songs of Experience.

More related to this story:
Writing for Time, Pat Regnier notes that part of the problem here is confusion about how cloud functionality works in iTunes. “Hate” is a strong word, I think, but people are certainly puzzled.

People Don’t Hate U2 Nearly as Much as They Hate iTunes
TechCrunch notes the rising importance of exclusives and the like, though I think this case demonstrates that backlash is a real risk:
The Music Industry Is About To Change, And Apple And U2 Are Just The Beginning
Berlin-based DJ and music pundit BarbNerdy notes that article. And speaking of backlash, she also notices that we’re starting to see promoted tracks in SoundCloud. That seems to be a bigger potential problem for the Web service than the (opt-in only, someday subscription opt-out) advertisements.

And I think this is why people are spooked. Do they really care about one U2 album? No. But this represents the world of music you don’t want, which to me is worse than advertisements. It’s payola all over again, more explicit than ever.

Microsoft In Talks To Buy Shoutcast And Winamp From AOL

Winamp
Winamp
Looks like the llama may not get off so easily after all. AOL yesterday announced that it was shutting down Winamp, media playing software for Windows and Android devices that it picked up through its 1999, $80 million acquisition of Nullsoft in 1999. But today Techcrunch has learned that AOL is talks with Microsoft to sell Winamp, along with Shoutcast, a media streaming service also developed by Nullsoft. We have also learned that AOL has been planning to announce the closure of Shoutcast next week.

AOL has declined to comment for this story, and we are still waiting to hear back from Microsoft with a response. From what we understand, the deal is not yet finalized, with AOL and Microsoft still working out the price. It could also be very wishful thinking from those intent on trying to save both services.

AOL did not give any guidance yesterday on what would happen with Shoutcast.

If this is correct, it would represent an interesting, and strange, twist in the story.

On the AOL side, it’s fairly clear why AOL is closing down Winamp and Shoutcast, and it makes sense why it would want to sell both
.
As an owner, AOL has never given much of a strong direction to the products, at a time when other digital music companies have been building up audiences and evolving technologies (although, as we pointed out earlier this week when writing about Rdio layoffs, the digital music business is tough). It has already shuttered and sold off other music assets as part of a bigger strategic shift to focus resources as a web publisher (it owns TechCrunch, Engadget, Huffington Post and a number of other bloggy properties), and as a rich-media advertising network operator across those and third-party sites, with an increasing focus on ad-tech to improve how those ads are delivered and measured.

Yes, music properties could very much fit into that mix, but not without a lot of financial and strategic investment in them.

On the Microsoft side, the Windows giant has had its own setbacks in music (RIP Zune). But it has more recently thrown a lot of eggs into the Xbox Music basket, which works on the Xbox 360, Windows 8, Windows RT, Windows Phone 8,iOS and Android devices, offering free, ad-supported streaming, subscriptions, and downloaded music.

Where would Winamp or Shoutcast fit into that mix? While I’m still trying to figure out what Microsoft would do with Winamp, Shoutcast has a platform that acts as a portal to over 50,000 radio stations. This could be one area that Microsoft might want to add to the Xbox Music
 platform, and which it currently lacks, to complement its Pandora-style personal radio feature.

Source: techcrunch.com