Rice can actually save your wet phone?

Rice can actually save your wet phone

Put your wet phone in rice will probably not save. But do it anyway

recently, during a weekend in upstate New York, I jumped into a lake with my shorts on. Unbeknownst to me, my ailing iPhone 5S SAT closely in my pocket. At some point during my swim, the phone slipped and vanished. I had no idea where it went to 26 hours later, when a swimmer noticed the phone the reflective Apple Logo winking at him from the lake the muddy ground. He was fishing it out and solemnly presents its soaking, lifeless corpse to me. "I'm sorry," he said.

"Jasmine, grain, risotto, dark, wild, or Basmati, put it in rice"

no matter how weak the perspective of revival, all wet telephone calls the same folk remedy: in rice, my friends were saying. Put it in rice, my parents said, and leave it there for at least a day. Jasmine, grain, risotto, dark, wild, or Basmati rice, put it in. So I did: I found an abandoned box of Uncle Ben's, buried under the grains my phone, put it back in the pantry, and waiting for the rice to work its magic.

In an era of the Genius Bars, man-on-robot Assault and do-it-yourself-handgun drones, the so-called rice Trick feels like a kernel of the ancient wisdom, passed on from generation to generation. You can almost imagine that our ancestors were overcooked your precious, mushy rice in burlap bags a long time ago. But where has the rice trick - and does it really work?

In July 2007, less than a month after the first iPhone was released, a MacRumors Forum member by the name of the jorsuss launches a thread called "I went in the water my iPhone" with a well known fairy tales: "I was the review of the phone, all calls or messages if i, and I went there in the coil." Jorsuss covered, the telephone with rice in what may have been the first documented attempt to use the rice trick on an iPhone. It did not work, but it is a proof that the method exists, before the iPhone, even if the details of the technology were fuzzy - "the rice, cooked or uncooked if he too dry, a water-soaked cell phone?" she asked a user on Yahoo Answers to the time.

A month earlier, in June 2007, Washington Post Reporter threw his BlackBerry in a toilet during the preparation for a date. If he helped his phone (and its date) on the rice trick, it deserves a personal account in the paper along with a letter on Lifehacker: "dry soaked from their gadgets in rice." But the Telefon-Speichern tip before the smartphone - back in 2000, at least a user uses it to help him back on Nokia 5130.

"Is the rice, cooked or uncooked?"

keep digging and you finally get to the most likely source of the trick: for many decades, Rice was used to dry the camera equipment and film in tropical locations. In 1996's Yankee magazine's make it last: over 1,000 ingenious ways to extend the life of everything you own, Earl Proulx writes, "If your camera into a warm, humid climate, a defense of rust and mold by some silica gel desiccant (available from the Kamera-Shops ) in a porous sack and save it with your camera equipment and film ... in a pinch of, replacement uncooked rice." In an article by a June 1946 edition of the popular photography, the author writes that while the silica is the preferred method of the attitude of exposed film dry, tea, brown paper, and rice can also work if your moisture capacity is so low that very large quantities are required to bring about a substantial impact." (People  Have been calling into question the power of the rice trick for at least half a century! ).

Photographer M. Scott Brauer, who has previously shot for the Edge, says he was not aware that the use of rice for the storage of film equipment was a "something", but that he himself has done it. A photographer who shot for the Edge, John Francis Peters, had never heard that the application for the rice Trick said, but it sounded "very interesting."

When the first telephone was immersed into a pile dry rice is impossible to say - but it is an ironic symmetry in the fact that we are still at the method, to our primary photography equipment safe.

So does the trick work? In 2014, Gazelle.com ran a semi-formal test that it is not. Of the seven budget desiccant you tested, uncooked rice was the least absorbent, behind cat litter, couscous, oatmeal and instant rice. Unless you are willing to earn more money, so that your phone to air-dry on a shelf, they may be the best option.

Craig architect's office, co-founder of TekDry, a company with "Not electronic device emergency services," says so too. TekDry has developed a stylish machine, is similar to a suitcase and negative pressure and low heat used to distribute active liquids from a properly impregnated telephone in about 20 minutes. In the past year, TekDry instructs consulting group DTJ on research into the effectiveness of rice. "In the experimental measurements, just a little more water evaporation was lost from the marshy device in an open space in the enclosure as in a container of rice", the study concludes. Of course, that the study should be in line with a modicum salt etc. . The research has been fully financed by a company whose business depends on the rice trick as ineffective.

The rice trick, because it sounds right, even if it does not, regardless of the

evidence, the rice trick, because it sounds right, even if it does not: Rice absorbs water; absorb water is the key to save a telephone, so rice save your phone. And each time, when a phone is in a toilet or sink, the trick is re-transmitted, from parents to children, from friend to Friend. Numerous references speak for the effectiveness of the rice. I have my own: I have personally dried my mobile phone in rice a number of times - once I have quinoa. It worked every time. Every time I repeat these stories, which I freely, I contribute, the rice trick of the myth.

The rice Trick has a unique and very powerful feature. The worst thing you can do to a wet phone, turn it on, before it dries completely - This is handy first-degree murder. In contrast to leave the phone on a sunny windowsill, the rice trick the phone out of sight, and perhaps for the meaning. The grains can not guard the device from the destructive forces of water, but the trick works temporarily remove a far more dangerous element: us and our impatient, Tech-driven neuroses. Spending 12 hours, 24 hours, or even a couple of days - depending on the instructions follow - without your phone can be tough. After you view it in plain text is more difficult. We are trying to power up too early, and to kill, something that we need.

But if we believe in the rice trick, we give it is time the work of his magic - time, perhaps the telephone with or without rice. In fact, the rice trick works, because we believe that it works.

Twenty-four hours after I took my phone into the box of rice, I pulled it out, loaded it up, and press the POWER button. I was stunned: The screen lights up and asked me back in my Apple ID. I did, and the entire system will boot properly: The camera didn't work, as well as the microphone and the speaker. Under the Screen, I could see pockets of moisture; and finally, the majority of them will evaporate. Within three days, it was hardly a track, my phone had spent a full day play U-boot. My phone was swimming with the fishes. But it was the electronic living dead. Spooky.

"It was the electronic living dead"

On Monday I braced in that office with my resuscitated the threshold as a modern telephone Dr. Frankenstein, down our throats my own freak of science. A whole day! At the bottom of a lake! My colleagues asked the inevitable question: Do you have it in rice? I have, I said. Of course, you have said, that is the trick always works.

But two weeks later, my cell phone has been slow responding. Then, one evening, they stopped receiving a signal completely, the word "Browse ... " tattooed permanently in the upper-left corner of the screen. I brought it to my provider, where a lady tries to do and the start and restart of the device ad infinitum. After 45 minutes, she turned to me, visibly frustrated. "Sir," she asked me, with a strip of distrust in her voice, "You have this phone wet?"

source: theverge.com

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