Here’s our first look at Motorola’s upcoming Moto G9 Play successor

The Moto G10 Play will succeed the Moto G9 Play, which was launched just two months back.

What you need to know

  • The first CAD-based renders of the Motorola G10 Play have surfaced.
  • The upcoming device will have a 6.5-inch flat display with a hole-punch cutout in the top-left corner.
  • It will also have a square camera bump on the back with a total of three sensors.

Motorola could soon expand its confusing Android smartphone lineup with a new Moto G10 series device, according to popular leaker @OnLeaks. The leaker has published a new post on his Voice page with the first CAD-renders of the upcoming phone, along with a few specs.

According to the leaker, the upcoming device carries the model number XT-2117 and is likely to be marketed as the Moto G10 Play. It is tipped to sport a 6.5-inch flat display with a sizeable chin at the bottom and a hole-punch cutout at the top-left corner.

On the back of the phone is a triple-camera setup housed within a square-shaped camera module. Unlike the Moto G9 Play, which has a rear-mounted fingerprint sensor, the Moto G10 Play will come with a side-mounted sensor. The renders also show a 3.5mm headphone jack on the top.

While the rest of the phone's specs remain a mystery currently, the XT-2117 recently bagged certifications from the FCC and TÜV Rheinland. According to the listing on the TÜV Rheinland website, the device packs a large 4,850mAh battery. The Moto G10 Play is tipped to be officially announced within the next few weeks, so we should hear more about the device soon.

Moto G Power

$230 at Amazon $230 at Best Buy $250 at Walmart

The Moto G Power is currently the best phone in Motorola's budget lineup. It delivers up to three days of battery life, has a modern design, and features a triple-camera setup on the back.



Source: androidcentral

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