Showing posts with label technical. Show all posts
Showing posts with label technical. Show all posts

How to install Windows 10 Technical Preview Now

How to install Windows 10 Technical Preview Now


Prior to installation


There are a couple of caveats to keep in mind before doing anything:

  • Backup your data first! Not that you had no excuse not anyway, but make sure to back up your data before upgrading if you have something that can not be recovered. Or even if it does not. Just do a backup.
  • You will not be able to use the recovery partition to downgrade. If you have a recovery partition on the system, which will no longer be able to restore your computer to the Windows version you had before.
  • Recovery will support external Rollback. As is expected, since it has a recovery partition, you need a floppy or USB with Windows 8 (or more) on it to go back to how things were, if you do not like or can not use Windows 10.

Microsoft As mentioned several times, this is a pre-release software and is expected to be very buggy and crash-prone probably. It is not recommended that you install this on your computer at work or anything that needs daily use. We will show you how to install it on a spare PC, or if you do not have one-on VirtualBox.

What you'll need


How to install Windows 10 Technical Preview


This time, Microsoft has created the Windows Insider Program to allow users to test the new itching. You will need to agree on a special status and conditions, which most probably is "do not blame us if it breaks things" in addition to the usual jargon. Besides downloading the update, the Insider Program will be how you provide feedback and get help from the community.

Once you're enrolled in the program, this is what you need:

  • A DVD or USB is large enough to contain a 4GB ISO file.
  • One of the ISO files of Windows 10
  • A spare computer to install it (Microsoft does not recommend using their daily driver), or VirtualBox installed on your main machine.

As soon as you are enrolled in the Insider Program, you will be directed to download one of several ISO files. Currently, there are four supported languages ​​(English, UK English, Simplified Chinese, Portuguese and Brazil), while configurations 32 and 64 bits. Grab the version that suits your needs and let the download do its job. Although you may want to grab a snack, as discharges ranging from 3-4GB depending.

Option One: Install the Technical Preview of Windows on your PC


 install Windows 10 Technical Preview Now


Once you have everything you need, follow these steps:

  1. Copy the ISO to a disk or USB drive. You can use a tool like ImgBurn to decompress the content,  even if you are installing on a device that is already running Windows, the operating system must be  able to mount the ISO itself.
  2. Insert the disc or USB drive into the computer you want to install Windows 10.
  3. If you have a previous copy of Windows installed on that machine, start it up and double-click  setup.exe from the installation disc. If you can not boot the PC from the installation disk to start the  installation.
  4. Follow the wizard to install Windows on your machine.

Microsoft wizard will guide you through the rest of the installation process. If you want to do a clean  install, be sure to choose "Hold Nothing" in the wizard.

Option Two: Install Windows Technical Preview in VirtualBox


How to install Windows 10 Technical Preview Now2


If you do not have a spare machine to test the prior art, it is recommended to install it on VirtualBox. That way, you can try it, see what's new, and play without overwriting your main system.
  1. Download and install the latest version of VirtualBox, and star t up.
  2. Click the "New" button in the main window to create a new virtual machine.
  3. Give your operating system a name (like "Windows 10 Technical Preview") and choose from the list windows 8.1 (from VirtualBox does not have a choice of Windows 10 yet).
  4. Follow the wizard to configure your VirtualBox virtual machine. You can read more about configuring VirtualBox here, but the default settings should be fine.
  5. When finished, you should see your new machine on the left sidebar. Click on it and click the Settings button at the top of the VirtualBox window.
  6. Head of Storage in the left sidebar, and next to "IDE Controller", click the Add button CD.
  7. Select "Select Disk" and browse to your downloaded Windows 10 ISO.
  8. Click OK.
  9. Press Start to start the new virtual machine and go through the process of installing Windows.

Remember this is a pre-release software, so install at your own risk! If you are not interested in risking your machine, we will be poring over the new operating system to let you know what other interesting things about Windows 10 has in store for the next two days. Good luck!

Is there a 'dark side' to Amazon drones, Google robots?

Amazon

I've got Amazon.com drones in my future.

I use Amazon's Prime delivery service for everything from rechargable batteries to art books to beef jerky, and so I was quite taken aback when CEO Jeff Bezos showcased a drone delivery system called Prime Air on 60 Minutes this past weekend. The idea is that packages below five pounds could be delivered straight from Amazon distribution centers to customers within 30 minutes using drones.

For now, it seems like half pipe dream, half pseudo-marketing: As many have observed, it probably wasn't a coincidence that the 60 Minutes segment aired on Sunday ahead of Cyber Monday, the busiest online shopping day of the year -- a good time for Amazon to be in the news.

Since Sunday's show, media coverage of Bezo's plan has overwhelmingly focused on the technical and logistical aspects of Prime Air.

For example, will the FAA be okay with all these drones flying around? Are they safe enough to fly around crowded cities and neighborhoods? And can Amazon economically operate what would be a presumably large fleet of drones?

And Amazon's not the only one in this game. The Verge reported that United Parcel Service is researching delivery drones, too.

Additionally, we learned this week that Google acquired seven robotics companies, which, according to a New York Times report, "are capable of creating technologies needed to build a mobile, dexterous robot."

Remember, Google has been experimenting with driverless cars, and is actually running a same-day delivery service in California, so it is definitely interested in humanless logistics, for lack of a better term.

The Dark Side

I find it a bit disturbing how little conversation there is about the possible negatives of replacing humans with machines for things like delivering packages.

Here's a passage from the Times' article that actually startled me a bit:

A realistic case, according to several specialists, would be automating portions of an existing supply chain that stretches from a factory floor to the companies that ship and deliver goods to a consumer's doorstep.

"The opportunity is massive," said Andrew McAfee, a principal research scientist at the M.I.T. Center for Digital Business. "There are still people who walk around in factories and pick things up in distribution centers and work in the back rooms of grocery stores."

In terms of the massive opportunity, it certainly isn't for the middle class. Mr. McAfee himself discussed this issue in a June piece from the M.I.T. Technology Review, fittingly titled "How Technology Destroys Jobs":

New technologies are "encroaching into human skills in a way that is completely unprecedented," McAfee says, and many middle-class jobs are right in the bull's-eye; even relatively high-skill work in education, medicine, and law is affected. "The middle seems to be going away," he adds. "The top and bottom are clearly getting farther apart." While technology might be only one factor, says McAfee, it has been an "underappreciated" one, and it is likely to become increasingly significant.

And what about the people who make a living in the back rooms of grocery stores? Should we simply write them off as left behind because machines are more productive?

Here's more from the Times' on Google's Andy Rubin, the engineer behind the Android operating system who is now heading up the company's robotics effort:

"I have a history of making my hobbies into a career," Mr. Rubin said in a telephone interview. "This is the world's greatest job. Being an engineer and a tinkerer, you start thinking about what you would want to build for yourself."

He used the example of a windshield wiper that has enough "intelligence" to operate when it rains, without human intervention, as a model for the kind of systems he is trying to create. That is consistent with a vision put forward by the Google co-founder Larry Page, who has argued that technology should be deployed wherever possible to free humans from drudgery and repetitive tasks.

Well, there are a lot of people who earn honest livings from drudgery and repetitive tasks.

My father dropped out of school at a pretty early age. But he went to trucking school and learned a skill that allowed him to earn a good living doing something he enjoyed. In fact, he'd still be doing it at 71 if he could get his big belly up into the cab.

Nonetheless, as much as he liked his job, he certainly experienced a lot of drudgery and repetition -- there was a lot of waking up at 4:00 a.m. to do round trips from Brooklyn to Indiana, and an awful lot of late nights on the road.

But would it have been better for that job to not exist?

The Great Debate

There's no standing in the way of technological advancement. But we shouldn't gloss over the inevitable friction that comes with evolution, especially since in this case, the end result looks like a class war.

The victims of this relentless innovation in automation will be, at least initially, people who work in factories, for delivery services, and in service industries like retail -- not the programmers and entrepreneurs who reap the economic benefits of increased productivity.

The good news is that a truly automated world still seems pretty far off.

But that's exactly why we should be talking about it now.

source:  usatoday.com

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