Skip to main content

Should you pick up the Venu 2 or Venu 2 Plus?

Fully-unlocked cellular potential

Garmin Venu 2 Plus

$450 at Amazon 

Pros

  • Supports Google Assistant, Siri, and Bixby commands
  • Can take phone calls on watch
  • Has a third button for two shortcuts
  • Best battery life in GPS mode

Cons

  • Slightly shorter daily battery life
  • More expensive

If you want to be able to answer calls or ask your favorite voice assistant a question without pulling out your phone, the new Venu 2 Plus justifies the slightly higher cost. Otherwise, it has the same software and sensors as the other Venu 2 watches, but only ships in one 43mm configuration.

Cutting costs, adding sizes, and colors

Garmin Venu 2 and 2S

$350 at Amazon 

Pros

  • Lower price, often on sale
  • 2S offers lighter, more colorful design
  • 2 extra days of daily battery life

Cons

  • No mic for calls or voice assistant
  • Only two nav buttons
  • Fewer GPS-tracking hours

Considering the Venu 2 watches' high cost of entry, you can forego cellular options and receive the same display (plus even better longevity) for a lower price. The Venu 2 offers a similar design, while the 2S gives you a smaller configuration that some will prefer.

If you're weighing which Venu 2 lineup to buy, rest assured that they share more similarities than differences. Each model has a pixel-rich AMOLED display, a plastic case with a steel bezel, water resistance, the same sensors, and other similar features. Of course, you're paying a substantial bill no matter which you choose, but is the new Venu 2 Plus worth spending a bit more? It depends on whether you want a lifestyle watch or a phone-independent one.

Garmin Venu 2 vs. Venu 2 Plus: A few key differences

The Venu 2 Plus summoning a voice assistant.

The newer Garmin Venu 2 Plus makes three specific upgrades on the Garmin Venu 2 and 2S: it adds a microphone, speaker, and a third navigation button on the side of the watch.

Courtesy of the mic and speaker, the Venu 2 Plus can take phone calls relayed through your nearby smartphone. Or, you can summon your favorite voice assistant to ask questions or start a workout.

These additions give your watch more utility and slightly dip the overall battery life. For example, the Venu 2 lasts 11 days in smartwatch mode or 8 hours of GPS time, while the Venu 2 Plus lasts just nine days — but also survives 24 hours of GPS tracking, several hours longer than the other Venu 2 watches.

All three watches have touchscreen navigation, but the Venu 2 and Venu 2S have just two buttons, while the Venu 2 Plus added a third. Each can start a workout or go back to the previous screen with a quick press, but only the Plus gives you two shortcuts with a short or long-press of the middle button. You can configure them to summon Garmin Pay, your voice assistant, a smartwatch, or whatever other functionality you need to access frequently and quickly.

Otherwise, you essentially get the same specs across the board. The 2 and 2 Plus are fairly heavy compared to most fitness trackers, while the Garmin Venu 2S offers a lighter experience if you can stomach the smaller display. You can rest assured that you'll get identical software, metrics, sports modes, and longer battery life than any other lifestyle watch.

Garmin Venu 2 Garmin Venu 2S Garmin Venu 2 Plus
Operating system Garmin OS
works with Android and iOS
Garmin OS
works with Android and iOS
Garmin OS
works with Android and iOS
Display 1.3-inch / 33mm
Corning Gorilla Glass 3
Color AMOLED touchscreen
1.1-inch / 29mm
Corning Gorilla Glass 3
Color AMOLED touchscreen
1.3-inch / 33mm
Corning Gorilla Glass 3
Color AMOLED touchscreen
Resolution 416x416 360x360 416x416
Case & bezel Fiber-reinforced polymer (plastic)
Stainless steel
Fiber-reinforced polymer (plastic)
Stainless steel
Fiber-reinforced polymer (plastic)
Stainless steel
Bands 22mm 18mm 20mm
Sensors GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO
HRM
barometric altimeter
compass
gyroscope
accelerometer
thermometer
amient light sensor
SpO2
GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO
HRM
barometric altimeter
compass
gyroscope
accelerometer
thermometer
amient light sensor
SpO2
GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO
HRM
barometric altimeter
compass
gyroscope
accelerometer
thermometer
amient light sensor
SpO2
Music storage up to 650 songs
works with Spotify, Deezer, Amazon Music
up to 650 songs
works with Spotify, Deezer, Amazon Music
up to 650 songs
works with Spotify, Deezer, Amazon Music
NFC payments Garmin Pay Garmin Pay Garmin Pay
Phone calls 🚫 🚫 ✔️
Voice assistants 🚫 🚫 Bixby, Google Assistant, Siri
LTE 🚫 🚫 🚫
Connectivity Bluetooth, ANT+, Wi-Fi Bluetooth, ANT+, Wi-Fi Bluetooth, ANT+, Wi-Fi
Battery 11 days (12 w/ battery saver)
8 hours GPS mode w/ music
22 hours GPS mode w/out music
proprietary charger
10 days (11 w/ battery saver)
7 hours GPS mode w/ music
19 hours GPS mode w/out music
proprietary charger
9 days (10 w/ battery saver)
8 hours GPS mode w/ music
24 hours GPS mode w/out music
proprietary charger
Wireless charging 🚫 🚫 🚫
Water-resistance 5 ATM 5 ATM 5 ATM
Dimensions 45.4 x 45.4 x 12.2mm 40.4 x 40.4 x 12.1mm 43.6 x 43.6 x 12.6mm
Weight 49g 38g 51g
Colors Slate, Silver Slate, Silver, Light Gold, Rose Gold Slate, Silver, Light Gold

The Garmin Venu 2 and 2S offer a fair compromise

When we first reviewed the Garmin Venu 2, we praised it as a fantastic device that costs too much for what it offers; if it could cost $100 less, it would probably number among the best Android smartwatches by far. But in the ensuing months, we've frequently seen it cost much less than its $400 list price.

With the new Venu 2 Plus likely to cost the full $450 for some time, if you can spot a sale on the Venu 2 or 2S, you may want to grab it on sale instead. The Venu 2 has built-in GPS and music storage, so you can easily work out without a smartphone. If you like leaving your phone behind for workouts, you might not need the Plus's cellular upgrades.

Also, for anyone with slimmer wrists, you may prefer the Venu 2S for its lighter weight and smaller display size. Plus, it has an exclusive, stylish Rose Gold variation you may love.

The Garmin Venu 2 Plus justifies the extra cost

If you can afford the extra cost, the Venu 2 Plus is the future-proofed option we'd recommend. Assuming you'll be getting in some constant workouts, it lasts hours longer than the others for actual workout-tracking, which may aid the reduced battery life from the mic and speakers.

Its smart assistant connectivity helps make the Venu 2 Plus a proper "lifestyle" watch and a fitness one. And we love the third button for accessing your favorite tools like NFC payments without having to scroll through menus. If you're planning to spend a hefty amount on a smartwatch, go Plus-sized; it's one of the best fitness smartwatches we've tested.

Fully-unlocked cellular potential

Garmin Venu 2 Plus

Tracks your workouts the longest

$450 at Amazon 

The Venu 2 Plus is the true final form of this watch lineup, offering everything you need for fitness and daily use. You won't regret springing for the option to answer phone calls on your wrist.

Cutting costs, adding sizes, and colors

Garmin Venu 2 and 2S

Go (rose) gold, save money

$350 at Amazon

If you don't mind missing out on a mic and speaker, the Garmin Venu 2 and 2S offers a gorgeous AMOLED display and thorough fitness metrics to help you hit your fitness goals.



Source: androidcentral

Popular posts from this blog

Review: The Teracube 2e is a more sustainable phone that you can afford

It just got easier to be green. If you know me or read my work here at AC, you know that I feel strongly about a few things when it comes to smartphones and consumer tech, and those things are not necessarily what some of my colleagues or others in the tech-sphere care about. You can have your 10x optical zoom cameras, folding phones, and 50W wireless charging devices all day, but I'm more interested in affordable to mid-range devices that last longer than you'd expect and which are at least trying to do environmental and social good. Sounds great, but it seems that it's harder to find this combination of features in a phone than the ultra-premium specced-out devices we typically talk about here on this website. That's why I was excited when I had the chance to write this Teracube 2e review. Teracube is a relatively new smartphone OEM based out of Redmond, WA, and founder Sharad Mittal's stated goal is to change the "disposable nature of the consumer ele

Google's new Guest Mode is like incognito mode for Google Assistant

Your interactions with Google Assistant will not be saved when Guest Mode is turned on. What you need to know Google Assistant is getting a new Guest Mode for privacy-conscious users. When it's turned on, the virtual assistant will not save any of its interactions with you. Turning it on and off is as simple as a single voice command. Google this week announced a new Guest Mode for its virtual assistant that's designed with privacy-conscious folks in mind. A simple "Hey Google, turn on Guest Mode" will ensure that none of your interactions with Google Assistant are collected by the company and nor will they be used to 'personalize your experience' — often an indirect way of referring to targeted ads. When it's on, the Assistant will play a special chime to let you know. Smart displays with Assistant will also show a guest icon on the screen. And you can always check for yourself by saying, "Hey Google, is Guest Mode on?" Even with G

Spotify Q1 beats on sales of $2B with monthly active users up 31% to 286M

The coronavirus may be decimating some corners of the economy, but the impact on the digital music, as evidenced by the world’s biggest music streaming company, appears to be minimal. Today Spotify reported its earnings for Q1 with revenues of €1.848 billion ($2 billion at today’s rates) and an inching into a positive net income of $1 million. Monthly active users (not total subscribers) now stand at 286 million, with paid (premium) users at 130 million and ad-supported monthly active users at 163 million. Ad-supported users are growing at a slightly higher rate at the moment, at 32% versus 31%, Spotify said. Spotify beat  analysts’ forecasts on both sales — they had on average been expecting revenues of $1.86 billion — and EPS, which had been forecast to be -$0.49 but came in at -$0.20 on a diluted basis and $0.00 undiluted. The numbers underscore the positive signals we’ve had from the wider industry. More generally, we have seen a huge boost in streaming media services — includ

Adobe is giving students and teachers free access to Creative Cloud

Your university's IT admin will need to make an application for access. What you need to know Adobe is temporarily making Creative Cloud free for teachers and students. The offer is aimed at enabling them to continue being productive as they work and study from home. Students cannot individually avail the promo, however, as the application for access needs to be made by a university's IT admin. As universities around the world shut their campuses and organizations ask their employees to work from home, many tech companies are making their products available to educational institutes free for use. Google and Microsoft have both made their large-scale communication and videoconferencing tools free for everyone, and now Adobe is temporarily giving free Creative Cloud access to students and teachers. The subscription, which usually costs $79.49 per month, will give affected students and teachers access to the entire range of Adobe's applications, such as Photoshop